Gabriel Jackson – The Lord’s Prayer

Settings of the Lord’s Prayer rarely work; they tend either to play it safe so as to preserve the solemn nature of the text (sung, as it invariably is, as a prayer during the service of Evensong), resulting in rather wan, characterless music, or go all out in an indulgement of vivid word-painting that loses sight of the function of the piece, becoming showy and egotistical. It’s a delicate balance, but the setting by Gabriel Jackson, composed in 2006, gets it just right. The style is simple, built upon a drone, over which melodic lines continually meander away and return to a bare open fifth; they’re characterised by grace notes that repeatedly give the melody a kick (a device also used in choral pieces by James MacMillan), thereby bringing them off the page, making them very much more than just a series of beautiful, mellifluous overlapping lines. The drone ceases when the text passes to the lower voices, although the harmony is sufficiently static that it almost continues by implication. In a rather brave move, Jackson breaks the intense petitionary tone of the music for the doxology; with an abrupt shift to the major key, the full choir joins together in a diatonic but richly-coloured chorale of praise that’s borderline unseemly after such humbly-delivered orisons. But, nonetheless, it does fit, and in any case subsides quickly, the closing “Amen” returning to the simpler manner from before.

It’s a gorgeous piece, but that’s not its strongest or most important quality; above all, Gabriel Jackson makes the music human, genuinely heartfelt, nothing at all like the familiar blank vacuity that passes for expression in so much contemporary choral music. This is real.

Broadcast in July last year, this sublime rendition of the piece took place during a service of choral Evening Prayer from Buckfast Abbey, as part of the 2011 Exon Singers’ Festival.

Gabriel Jackson – The Lord’s Prayer

FLAC [13Mb]

Posted on by 5:4 in Lent Series
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