HCMF 2013: n s m b l

All good noise reduction filters have an option to invert their output, effectively delivering only the removed audio information, mainly hiss & microscopic blurps, along with thin slivers of the primary audio material, little more than the most anaemic of glimpses, hinting at what lies on the other side. These kind of residua bear a strong resemblance to the music of Jakob Ullmann, whose Son Imaginaire III received its world première in St Paul’s Hall last night. The concert wasn’t just a highlight of my HCMF 2013, it was a highlight of my entire concert-going life. However, my enthusiasm for Ullmann’s work (previously manifested here & here) clearly continues to put me in a minority. The pre-concert talk, which i had fully expected to see packed to the point of standing room only, found half of the seats empty, & the concert itself, although better attended, had many seats to spare. Even in Huddersfield, it seems, audiences still have a thing or two to learn.

Having said that, perhaps even Ullmann would consider disinterest a step in the right direction from the outright hostility that has dogged his work in the past. Son Imaginaire III is a case in point; last night’s performance was the third attempt to give the piece a successful première, the previous two being mocked & laughed to the point of being abandoned. The bone of contention in Ullmann’s work is its challenging modus operandi, utilising extremely quiet sounds as the basis for large-scale forms. In some ways, this can be heard as a continuation (or elaboration) of the paradigm shift initiated by John Cage in 4’33”. In that piece, no sound was capable of being extraneous; in Ullmann’s music, any quiet peripheral sounds can be inferred as part of the deliberate musical act taking place: a chair squeak, a muffled cough, a phone vibration, a gust of wind against the windows, they all become plausible components of Ullmann’s loose-weave texture. They, too, are incapable of being extraneous.

But i don’t want to push that connection too far; there is, after all, a world of difference between silence & near silence. The title is instructive—suggesting both “imagined sound” & “his imagination”—as it describes very literally the effect of listening in such a rarefied context as this. The strain of having to listen out for exceptionally quiet sounds makes it all too easy for the imagination to overclock itself, so to speak, to the point where, in such a liminal state, it’s possible to imagine things that aren’t there. It reminds me of the film Paranormal Activity, where lengthy scenes take place in which, essentially, nothing happens, but there are omnipresent omens suggesting that, at some point soon, something very odd indeed will take place. Our eyes scour the frame—the door, the bed, the floor, the corridor, the sleeping couple—fuelled by a heightened mix of excitement & expectation; & here, too, one can all too easily imagine things that are not there. Did the blanket move? Is that a shadow? Did something rustle? Transpose that to the concert hall: Did the cello play a harmonic? Is that the sound of wind through the instrument? Was that a twang on the piano? Often, they’re questions impossible to answer; Ullmann’s music is so perfectly poised at the cusp of sensibility that the space becomes positively electrified with sonic potentialities, real & imagined.

It’s a considerable challenge as much for the performers as the audience; French group n s m b l (10 points if you can say that out loud) handled it with admirable coolness, & can now bask in the renown of being the first ensemble in almost a quarter of a century to have been able to bring this remarkable piece to fruition. Those of you who weren’t there, you have no idea what you missed.

Posted on by 5:4 in Concerts, HCMF
Tags: ,

6 Responses to HCMF 2013: n s m b l

  1. duncan macgregor

    As you say, an outstanding concert. Certainly one of the most challenging concerts of my life and one of the most awesome (in the literal sense of the word). I’m not sure if I liked it (“like” seems an inappropriate word to consider) – it was a complete head-fuck on a piece (and performance) and three days later I’m still trying to come to terms with it. I feel very, very lucky to have been there.

    • 5:4

      i think we should all think ourselves lucky; genuinely one of those concerts that (at present at least) comes along once in a blue moon. Graham McKenzie told me he’s keen to include more Ullmann in future festivals, so let’s hope that happens.

  2. Tim

    Argh. I thought this would happen. It just wasn’t easily feasible for me to make it up to Hudds for this one, and I feared it was going to be something special. I’m happy for you that I was right!

    • 5:4

      Ah Tim, another suffer of “the HCMF qualm” – i feel for you buddy, i really do! Having said that, i’m glad it was you taking the mystery bus tour to A – a shadow opera & not i – talk about taking one for the team ;)

  3. Tim

    I see that son Imaginaire III is scheduled to be performed in Paris next June. Maybe worth making a trip:

    http://www.janedickson.net/

    I don’t think I played a great hand at HCMF this year. Or maybe that’s just a grass/greener thing.

    • 5:4

      i still can’t believe we missed each other!

      Thanks for the Paris tip-off, not that one needs an excuse for a visit but that’s a good one :)

Add a Comment

Anti-Spam Quiz: