Arlene Sierra

Mixtape #43 : International Women’s Day

Posted on by 5:4 in Mixtapes | 1 Comment

As today is International Women’s Day, for my March mixtape i’ve allowed myself to indulge in a celebration of fabulous music by women composers and musicians. Compared to most of my mixtapes, this was one of the more difficult to create, for two reasons. First, because the shortlist of music i was keen to include wasn’t remotely short, but simply enormous (137 individual tracks, lasting a little over 12 hours), and second, because deciding which of them to omit was tough in the extreme. In the end, though, i found an interesting and, i hope, imaginative way of navigating through such a bewilderingly diverse collection of music. There’s no particular structure to the mix as a whole this time, as i was simply allowing myself to be drawn spontaneously from piece to piece, sometimes smoothly, sometimes breaking things up with non sequiturs.

There’s a not quite even split between instrumental and vocal music, though both of these terms are interpreted pretty eclectically. The latter range across the spectrum of sentiments, from poignant and painful (Brika, Laura Sheeran, FKA Twigs, Galina Grigorjeva, Lori Cullen) to passionate and elated (Anna von Hausswolf, Cocteau Twins, Princess Chelsea, Sleigh Bells, Jackie Trent, Ari Mason, Vanbot, Carice van Houten, Peaches, Trio Mediaeval, Ladyhawke), both of widely varying orders of magnitude, alongside the more reflective (EmikaRóisín Murphy, Demen, Zola Jesus, Nynke Laverman, OY, ionnalee, Robyn) and downright demented (Jennifer Walshe – who else?).

As for the instrumental music, not all of it is non-vocal: the pieces by Gazelle Twin, Lauren Redhead and Annette Vande Gorne occupy an electroacoustic place in between, each utilising voices in different ways. As for the rest, perhaps the most applicable continuum is between strains of agitation and disquiet (Jocelyn Pook, Kristin Øhrn Dyrud, AGF, Copeland, Zeena Parkins, Elizabeth Anderson, Natasha Barrett, Mica Levi, Wendy Bevan, Clara Iannotta, Pauline Oliveros, Rose Dodd, Vanessa Rossetto, Chaya Czernowin, Rebecca Saunders, Arlene Sierra, Galina Ustvolskaya, Line Katcho, Milica Djordjević) and calmer, more measured music (Olga Neuwirth, Linda Catlin Smith, Anna Þordvaldsdóttir, Motion Sickness of Time Travel, Chiyoko Szlavnics, Unsuk Chin, Christina VantzouÉliane Radigue, Delia Derbyshire, Isnaj Dui, Susanne Sundfør).

Elizabeth Parker‘s radiophonic cheerfulness doesn’t qualify as either of those, but then pretty much none of the 60 wonderful pieces i’ve featured on this mix fit neatly within one particular box or label: their inventiveness is boundary-challenging, which makes them ideal for a day like today. Apropos: i’ve ended the mix with a track by Frida Sundemo that beautifully captures a sense of optimism, which i think is also ideal for this particular day; the song’s theme is love, yet its emphasis on ‘flashbacks and futures’ seems an apt phrase for the confident, forward-looking attitude exhibited by all of this music, and which this mixtape celebrates.

The mixtape can be downloaded and streamed below; here’s the tracklisting in full, together with links to obtain each of the albums: Read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cheltenham Music Festival 2016: Ritual in Transfigured Time, Ukes and Moogs

Posted on by 5:4 in Concerts, Festivals, Premières | 2 Comments

For new music at the Cheltenham Music Festival, the key phrase yesterday was “transfigured time”. Time in the sense of history, as two of the concerts directly explored, confronted, embraced and challenged contemporary music’s relationship with instruments, images and idioms from the past. The afternoon event at Parabola Arts Centre featured the Goldfield Ensemble and Langham Research Centre in a concert that unfolded as a long-form electroacoustic audiovisual meditation on these ideas. The conjunction of sound and sight often proved problematic; Arlene Sierra‘s music, receiving its first performance, written to accompany Russian avant-garde filmmaker Maya Deren‘s 1946 silent Ritual in Transfigured Time (from which the concert took its title) rather optimistically opted for a bald, minimalistic collection of recurring gestures and motifs that established an aural unity jarringly at odds with the film’s bold tilt-shifts and narrative evasiveness. Deren’s visual language is admittedly gestural in this work to some extent, but its palette of actions and contexts, combined with their allusive distance–not to mention her insistence that form should be ritualistic—is broader and more demonstrative than the rooted and increasingly monotonous music Sierra provided for it. Even more problematic was the presentation of Edgard Varèse‘s 1958 masterpiece Poème électronique which recreated the work’s original presentation at the Brussels World Fair (within a pavilion designed principally by Xenakis), where it was accompanied by a film of fleeting images created by Le Corbusier. Despite being, one assumes, as the composer originally intended, it nonetheless works against the music in two respects. First, the visuals simply diminish the prevailing modernity of Varèse’s music, bringing to mind similar audiovisual works involving composers such as Roberto Gerhard and Bernard Parmegiani, where the film element fails to live up to the scope of the music. That was the case here, and secondly, rather than coming across as a ‘period piece’, Poème électronique instead seemed to acquire an unwarranted hauntological quality, as though it had been executed by Demdike Stare or Ghost Box, curiously militating against the music’s authenticity. Read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mixtape #32 : Best Albums of 2014

Posted on by 5:4 in Best of the Year, Mixtapes | Leave a comment

HAPPY NEW YEAR everyone!

Many, many thanks to all of you who have followed the blog through the last 12 months, particularly to all those who have commented and tweeted in response or retort. As usual, here’s my new year mixtape featuring a track from all forty of my Best Albums of the Year. i said yesterday how 2014 had been a breathtaking year, and listening to this 3-hour condensed version of its best music, i really think that becomes obvious.

Enjoy! – and assuming you do, please support the artists wherever possible; links to purchase each of the albums can be found on the last two days’ articles.

Here’s the tracklisting in full, followed by the download link; and you can also stream the mixtape via Mixcloud. Read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Best Albums of 2014 (Part 2)

Posted on by 5:4 in Best of the Year | 3 Comments
* Please note this list has how been superseded by the one on the Best Albums of the Years page *

Bringing the main course to an end, here’s the conclusion of the countdown of my forty best albums of 2014. It’s been a breathtaking year.

20 | Salvatore Sciarrino – Cantare con silenzio

Easily one of the strangest albums of the year, from a composer who continues to push back the boundaries of what constitutes contemporary classical music. Two of the three works on the disc focus on the flute, sometimes violently foregrounding it while elsewhere it becomes lost amidst heavier forces. The oldest work on the disc, Berceuse, is wonderfully weird, summarised in my original review as “like a seething, roiling organic mass, acting in waves of dense, surging material, it’s as inscrutable as it is hypnotic”. [Presto Classical]

19 | Bass Communion – Box Set

This rather wondrous 4-disc box set brings together a considerable number of rarities from Steven Wilson’s Bass Communion back catalogue. The earliest dates from as far back as 1998, the first of the deeply impressive Indicates Void series based on individual instruments, all of which still sound overwhelmingly modern. In many ways the collection proves how polarised is the Bass Communion canon, not just encompassing but often directly addressing extremes of serenity and cacophany. Regardless of which end of the spectrum Wilson finds himself, his highly-sculpted results are staggering to behold. [Steven Wilson HQ]

18 | irr. app. (ext.) – The Jennies Made Me Do It {1}

Three pieces originating in Matt Waldron’s collaborations and split releases with the equally unhinged At Jennie Richie, they chart an ambitious path through highly complex sonic imagery. ‘Studio Backflow’, unusually for Waldron, is driven along by a relentless pulse, slowly processing past a kaleidoscope of manic sights; ‘Foregone And Ungotten’—the highlight of the disc—begins as a radiant texture before passing down into something altogether more sinister and strange, whereupon it fragments and roams around in a seemingly endless dark space. [Bandcamp]

17 | OY – No Problem Saloon

One of 2014’s most marvellous oddities, No Problem Saloon melds African & European styles and manners into a uniquely congruous confection. Unaffected almost to a fault, OY’s lyrics tackle subjects almost embarrassingly slight (the joys of afros and dreadlocks) as well as deeply profound, the latter captured in the album’s standout track ‘Doondari’, which recounts in detail the stages of the Fulani story of the creation of the world. From my review: “Essentially a slice of drum-pumped electronica, Frempong’s rapid meandering through the repetitions of the story resembles a scrambling recitative passing through an assortment of episodes that skew off at oblique angles, the references to creation & milk finally combining in the quiet wail of a baby.” [Crammed Discs]

16 | Senko – Dronetudes

Despite the title of Danish musician Daniel Kosenko’s latest album, drones are not the primary focus of Dronetudes. Some of these absorbing studies do involve them, draped like large swatches of fabric across each other to create extended forms that shift and shimmer. Beats predominate too, though, existing both in sympathy with and counter to this slower material, and Kosenko clearly revels in the disjunct interrelationship, heard to best effect in ‘karpus trio’—a track that clearly can’t sit still—and album opener ‘wolfsong’, the underlying light of which is continually flecked and tickled by surface-layer beat tracery. [Hymen]

15 | John Pickard – Gaia Symphony / Eden

John Pickard’s magnum opus for brass orchestra and percussion has been given a superb new recording by the Norwegian Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag. Although daunting in terms of both scale and scope, the Gaia Symphony is an immensely accessible and immediate work, carving “huge, rough shapes but handles them as though they were fluid, forming them into pounding rhythms and pseudo-fanfares” (from my review). Anyone potentially put off by the thought of 65 minutes of brass music: think again – Pickard has revivified the medium for the 21st century in this astounding piece. [Presto Classical]

14 | Joseph Trapanese, Aria Prayogi & Fajar Yuskemal – The Raid 2 (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

One of 2014’s most exhilarating movies needed nothing less than a score that matched it in terms of both violence and dexterity. What it got was easily the year’s most breathtaking soundtrack, one that moved and acted with the skill of the film’s hero, Rama – biding its time (and thereby tapping deeply into the emotional subtexts that run like threads throughout) before unleashing onslaughts of unimaginable ferocity and virtuosity. Music remade as a martial art. [Amazon]

13 | Markus Reuter – Sultry Kissing Lounge (Crimson ProjeKCt Tour 2014)

Superficially similar to the EP of tracks recorded in Australasia (included in my Best EPs of the Year list), this extended set originating in European concerts goes very much further and deeper. ‘Patricia’ sets the bar very high, filled with surging triadic waves that continually hint at but thwart any cadential connotations; ‘Lorena’ opts for a vaguer harmonic language that threatens to be dragged into the depths. All 13 of these remarkable improvisations are outstandingly beautiful, crowned by Reuter’s thrilling white-hot guitar improvisations, frenzies shaped into melodies like strands of lightning from a Tesla coil. [Iapetus]

12 | St. Vincent – St. Vincent

Something from Annie Clark’s collaboration with David Byrne seems to have rubbed off, as her latest album has a distinctly heavyweight lollop in its step from the get go. Songs like ‘Rattlesnake’, ‘Birth in Reverse’ and ‘Digital Witness’ are punchy as hell, eat beat like a slap in the chops. Her experimental nature still pervades every song, making even relatively conventional numbers like ‘Psychopath’ sound oblique; standout track ‘Bring Me Your Loves’ encapsulates the album, pushed along with military precision while exploring unexpected side alleys en route. Not a verse-chorus structure in sight. [Amazon]

11 | John Cage – Works for Two Keyboards • 2

Xenia Pestova, reigning queen of the toy piano, reunites with Pascal Meyer on this superb second survey of John Cage’s two-keyboard music. In my review i remarked how their performance of Music for Amplified Toy Pianos “is as fascinating as it is laugh-out-loud hilarious, their navigation through Cage’s indeterminate score resulting in a mercurial kind of halting hocket between the toy pianos & an array of bizarre sounds.” The prepared piano music is no less striking (and more gamelan-like than ever), testifying to the continual freshness and unpredictability of Cage’s music. [Amazon] Read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New releases: ensemble/orchestral

Posted on by 5:4 in CD/Digital releases | 1 Comment

The majority of new releases to have come my way recently have featured music for ensemble and/or orchestral forces, each disc of which is usually devoted to the work of a single composer. The opportunity to scrutinise an individual’s work in great depth at times turns out to be something of a mixed blessing. This is definitely the case with NMC’s recent disc of Helen Grime‘s music, Night Songs. i’ve enjoyed and written about Grime’s work on a number of occasions, but this album—which, helpfully, arranges its contents in chronological order—contextualises those works such that rather glaring problems instantly emerge. Chief of them all is the extreme narrowness of Grime’s compositional language, with regular recourse to precisely the same mannerisms and tropes in pretty much every piece. Take a drawn-out melodic line, put it mid-register and not too loud, adorn it with sharp staccato notes (woodwind or pizzicato strings) and far, far beneath it have grumbling deep bass phrases. This kind of thing has worked for Oliver Knussen, and on the basis of this disc, Grime seems to feel compelled to introduce this same device into everything she writes. It’s an irritation that gets compounded by the timidity of Grime’s orchestral writing; not merely her safe, familiar use of the instruments, it’s the lack of anything approximating a release, a true letting-go of control, that makes the majority of the seven works on this disc feel so thoroughly grounded. Striving for equilibrium doesn’t require one to be so equivocal. Read more

Tags: , , , , ,

Cheltenham Music Festival 2014: Fidelio Trio, The Will Gregory Moog Ensemble, Tokaido Road

Posted on by 5:4 in Concerts, Festivals, Premières | 1 Comment

Over the weekend, three concerts at the Cheltenham Music Festival, in different ways and for different reasons, caused one to reflect on the present within the context of ideas, experiences and memories from the past. The most frustrating and patience-testing were to found in the Saturday afternoon recital at the Pittville Pump Room given by the Fidelio Trio, the first half of which presented a threesome of works of the kind where composers dearly wish them to be more than the sum of their parts. Graham Fitkin‘s Lens, Michael Zev Gordon‘s Roseland and Tom Stewart‘s Flying Kites: Concentric Circles (receiving its première) took turns to mooch through material so terrified of doing anything demonstrative that they remained trapped in a limbo of blank tonality. Restraint and simplicity do not make something profound, a fact lost on these pieces, their respective blind, senile, melismatic bleatings lacking any meaningful emotional weight or poignancy. The second half brought relief: Piers Hellawell‘s Etruscan Games offered very much more focused lyricism, the ambitious third movement in particular exploring an impressive density of counterpoint. Arlene Sierra‘s duo Avian Mirrors provided three charming snapshots of behaviour, the last of which, ‘Display’, was amusingly direct, violin and cello (serendipitously played on this occasion by men) becoming a preening, posturing pair of rivals in search of a mate, the material a wild display of testosterone-fuelled showmanship. But overshadowing them all was the concert’s final work and second première: Gavin HigginsThe Ruins of Detroit. Where the music of the first half seemed to cleave to something undefinable from a less-demanding earlier age, Higgins confronted the past with courage. Titled after and inspired by the famous photographs by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre, the piece opened in a place of anaemic fragility (bringing to mind the start of Thomas Adès’ Arcadiana), given hauntological resonance in deep muted piano notes. Here, finally, was lyricism was a real sense of context. Negotiated with necessary sensitivity by the Fidelio Trio, Higgins’ textures were often strikingly vivid, as in a later episode where the piano became a kind of abstract water dripping on romantic memories of former glories. Appropriately, the material often decayed from melody to fragment to gesture, during which one became aware of something vestigial beneath; the conclusion said it all, a sad downward sagging, under the combination of both physical and nostalgic weight. Read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cheltenham Music Festival 2014: An Evening with Nicola Benedetti

Posted on by 5:4 in Concerts, Festivals | 1 Comment

Once upon a time, it bore the proud title Cheltenham Festival of British Contemporary Music; for the last 50 years, it’s simply been Cheltenham Music Festival. Even though it has to a large extent yielded to the essentially conservative musical taste that pervades this part of the Cotswolds (as a Cheltonian myself, I can say that without compunction), Cheltenham has evolved into a festival where music old and new sit side by side, with many concerts featuring at least one contemporary work. There have been times, over the years, when this ancient/modern adjacency has felt forced, even apologetic. However, last night’s event, in our rather grand Town Hall, was nothing of the kind. Read more

Tags: , ,

Mixtape #22 : Best Albums of 2011

Posted on by 5:4 in Best of the Year, Mixtapes | 3 Comments

A very HAPPY NEW YEAR to you all! 5:4 is four years old today, & as in previous years, here’s a new mixtape showcasing the music from my best albums of 2011. One track from each of them—in total, 3½ hours of eclectica to start the new year in real sonic style. Do, please, support all the artists if you like what you hear (& you will!); links to buy their excellent music are included on the previous few days’ posts.

Here’s the full tracklisting (click the image for high-res artwork):

Uh Huh Her – Wake To Sleep (from Nocturnes)
This Will Destroy You – Black Dunes (from Tunnel Blanket)
Philippe Petit – 03 nyctalopia (from Nyctalopia)
Kate Havnevik – Mouth 2 Mouth (from You)
Aleks Kolkowski & Ute Wassermann – nor’easter (from Squall Line)
Kate Wax – Maze Rider (Live From The Cave) (from Dust Collision)
Arlene Sierra – Surrounded Ground – III. Egress (from Arlene Sierra Vol. 1)
John Cage – 109 [One8 and 108] [excerpt] (from 108/109/110)
Autechre & The Hafler Trio – ha3oe [excerpt] (from ae3o3)
David Lynch – Bass D Dark Stairway (from INLAND EMPIRE (Original Motion Picture Score))
Patrick Wolf – House (from Lupercalia)
Roly Porter – Al Dhanab (from Aftertime)
Braids – Plath Heart (from Native Speaker)
Deerhoof – Super Duper Rescue Heads! (from Deerhoof vs. Evil)
Talvihorros – Beta (from Descent Into Delta)
Christopher William Anderson – An End To Calm (from Moskenstraumen)
Stephan Mathieu – A Static Place Ia [excerpt] (from A Static Place)
Frank Zappa – Worms From Hell (from Feeding The Monkies At Ma Maison)
Leyland Kirby – Eventually, it eats your lungs [excerpt] (from Intrigue & Stuff Volume 2)
Celer – Part II [excerpt] (from Noctilucent Clouds)
Merzbow – Kamadhenu (Part 1) [excerpt] (from Kamadhenu)
Ulver – Providence (from Wars of the Roses)
Chubby Wolf – Deeper and the Damage From (from Los que No Son Gentos)
aTelecine – The Smuggler (Draft One) (from A Cassette Tape Culture Phase Two)
Akita / Gustafsson / O’Rourke – Two Bird [excerpt] (from One Bird Two Bird)
Tartar Lamb II – Polyimage of Known Exits: 3rd Movement [excerpt] (from Polyimage of Known Exits)
Hecq – With Angels (from Avenger)
Jenny Hval – Engines in the City (from Viscera)
Björk – Hollow (from Biophilia)
Ektoise – There and Here (from Kiyomizu)
Svarte Greiner – Twin [excerpt] (from Twin)
Access to Arasaka – Ixion (from Geosynchron)
Grutronic and Evan Parker – Mesomerism In Rhythm [excerpt] (from Together In Zero Space)
Xela – Charm [excerpt] (from Exorcism)
Black Swan – White Mourning (from The Quiet Divide)
Fovea Hex – Falling Things (Where Does A Girl Begin?) (from Here Is Where We Used To Sing)
Indignant Senility – Side B [excerpt] (from Blemished Breasts)
Monty Adkins – Memory Box (from Fragile.Flicker.Fragment)
Three Trapped Tigers – Magne (from Route One Or Die)
The Mount Fuji Doomjazz Corporation – Function (from Anthropomorphic)


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Best Albums of 2011 (Part 1)

Posted on by 5:4 in Best of the Year | Leave a comment
* Please note this list has how been superseded by the one on the Best Albums of the Years page *

The list exists as a way of celebrating the known things which we all share that make us part of the same adventure, but the list also exists as a way of referring to the less-known things, which can remind us that the adventure does not have to be the same for everyone. […] The unfamiliar lists are routes at the edges of the city, in the shadows […] that make us feel a different kind of excitement, the excitement of discovery, the excitement of change. The change that makes the adventure constantly surprising. (Paul Morley, Words and Music)

Here’s the first part of my list of the best albums released this year; i hope in some small part it lives up to what Paul Morley is talking about.

40 | Uh Huh Her – Nocturnes
Uh Huh Her’s EP Black and Blue, released in the spring (and included on yesterday’s Best EPs list), hinted at what was coming, and that promise has been abundantly fulfilled on this album, the duo’s first in three years. Their edgy rock sound, propelled by synths, makes for a fascinating combination with the girls’ trademark lyrical vocal style, resulting in a rare kind of electropop that packs a surprisingly emotional punch. Occasional influences reveal themselves (Björk, Elizabeth Fraser) but Uh Huh Her have finally developed a sound all to themselves. It’s a shame the album is yet another victim of the loudness war, but the songs manage to rise above it. [UhHuhHer.com | iTunes]

39 | This Will Destroy You – Tunnel Blanket
You can’t mess around if you’re going to call yourselves This Will Destroy You, and there’s absolutely no messing on the group’s second album. The eight tracks progress at a sedate pace, made highly dramatic through the strategic use of lengthy quiet episodes. Subsequent loud eruptions solemnly plough noisy doomgaze territory, but TWDY’s interests extend beyond the confines of conventional post-rock; “Glass Realms”, in particular, inhabits a place of radiant ambient calm, and while the overarching theme is clearly a dark one, there’s so much beauty in evidence that it’s all too easy to forget that. [Amazon | iTunes]

38 | Philippe Petit – Nyctalopia
No-one destroys sound like Philippe Petit, and on this album there are more grit-scarred layers than ever. The distinction between treated recordings and live sounds created in the studio is similarly broken down, each track embodying both a ruthless sense of method and an aggressive spontaneity. Petit’s method, though, isn’t too far removed from madness, layer heaped upon layer until the ear can barely make sense of the complex textures that result. The power and intensity of this music mean that Nyctalopia is not a particularly easy listen, but it’s an undeniably rewarding one. [Free download]

37 | Kate Havnevik – You
Continuing the trend of outstanding Scandinavian pop, Kate Havnevik has clearly put the five years since her debut album to good use, as Youfinanced via PledgeMusic—is a huge leap forward. There are still occasions when she strays a little too closely to the sound of Imogen Heap (perhaps due to Guy Sigsworth’s involvement), but many of the songs are now nicely distinctive; the shuffling “Castaway” shows off the power of Havnevik’s voice, while “Soon” and “Tears in Rain” surround her with scintillating analogue electronics. [KateHavnevik.com]

36 | Aleks Kolkowski & Ute Wassermann – Squall Line
Ute Wassermann’s collaborations with Aleks Kolkowski go back a number of years (a pair of recordings from the 2007 Interlace concerts can be downloaded here), but this is the first time their bewildering music has been officially released. Anyone familiar with Wassermann’s incredible feats of vocal gymnastics will, at least in part, know what to expect—and, in fact, a few of the pieces (each inspired by weather systems) feel a little too gesturally familiar; but for the most part, it’s impossible to know who’s doing what or indeed how, and their combined music is a delirious triumph of improvisation.

35 | Kate Wax – Dust Collision
Kate Wax is the pseudonym of Aisha Devi Enz, who describes herself as “Swiss-born, half-Tibetan”. Hardly surprising, then, that’s she’s prone to do things a little differently, and while her songs have a recognisable dance aspect, this is always at the mercy of a determined urge to experiment. Take “Maze Rider (Live From The Cave)”, for instance, where a cold sawtooth bass underpins Wax’s twisting vocal line; later episodes with beats seem almost a concession in such a context as this. Elsewhere—as in the title track and “Holy Beast”—she’s more recognisably conventional, but this is the exception rather than the rule, and as a whole this is one of the year’s most interesting and successful albums of truly experimental songs.

34 | Arlene Sierra – Arlene Sierra Vol. 1
Just when you start wondering whether contemporary instrumental music doesn’t have anything new left to explore, along comes this, the first compilation of Arlene Sierra’s music. The earliest included work (Ballistae) is a decade old, but the rest of the pieces date from within the last five years. Sierra’s music is fresh and unpredictable, and the works connected with creatures—the chamber piece Cicada Shell and Birds and Insects for solo piano—make a particularly strong impression. A vocal work, Two Neruda Odes, indicates a lyrical streak to her work, but this appears to be of only secondary interest; Sierra is most in her element exploring rather hectic, scurrying textures. Superb performances throughout; the “Vol. 1” in the CD title is nicely optimistic—one hopes it’s not too long before there’s a Vol. 2. [Amazon]

33 | John Cage – 108/109/110
John Cage’s number pieces, composed late in his life, are among the most enigmatic of his entire output. They break down all kinds of conventions, adopting a form of notation known as the “time bracket technique”, constructing works from fragments of material with indications as to when they take place. The titles derive from the number of players involved, and frequently Cage stipulated that one piece could be performed simulataneously with others to form new compositional entities. This album focuses on Cage’s largest number work, 108, performed by itself and in conjunction with One8 and Two3. The performances (by the wonderfully-named “Chance Philharmonic”) are magnificent and the soundworld is riveting throughout, demonstrating anew how our understanding of Cage’s music is still a work-in-progress. [CDBaby | Amazon]

32 | Autechre & The Hafler Trio – ae3o3
i dare say this release, quite apart from the intentions of its creators, got hyped up way more than it should have, being announced and postponed repeatedly for about three years. When it finally emerged, back in the summer, the resulting music probably thwarted more than a few expectations—but taken on its own terms, this is a fine addition to the previous collaborations between these artists. Quite what Autechre’s involvement consists of remains unclear; once again, in both style and duration (lasting 3¾ hours), ae3o3 comes across entirely as a Hafler Trio work, forming large-scale sound sculptures from slow-moving, granite-like slabs of noise. The first of the two tracks, ‘ah3eo’, is a little bland and goes over ground pretty much covered before, but the second track, ‘ha3oe’ is very exciting indeed, one of the finest electronic compositions i’ve heard this year. [Norman Records]

31 | David Lynch – INLAND EMPIRE (Original Motion Picture Score)
Since relaunching his website, David Lynch has been primarily concerned with releasing supplementary material connected with Twin Peaks. But this year he also released a new version of the soundtrack to his last film INLAND EMPIRE, doing away with the songs and incidental music, replacing them with an additional 25 minutes of the score Lynch himself composed for the film (in a break with tradition, Angelo Badalamenti wasn’t involved this time). As such, the album is now far more consistent and genuinely representative of INLAND EMPIRE, a sound tapestry that’s as dark and intractible as the film itself. Lynch has clearly enjoyed experimenting with pop this year, but it’s in territory like this that he’s clearly most adept and at home, creating some of the best and most telling dark ambient ever made. [DavidLynch.com]

30 | Patrick Wolf – Lupercalia
Finding love has clearly had a wonderful creative impact on Patrick Wolf. There’s an audible spring-in-the-step on many of the songs, such as “Time of my Life” (with some stylistic echoes of Florence), “Together” and “The Falcons”, intermingled with elements of electropop, a broad palette of experimental sounds, and assorted mannerisms—both synth and vocal—that evoke the 1980s. The standout track, though, is “House”, a song celebrating that most prosaic and profound of things, setting up home with a loved one: “I love that here you live with me/Gives me the greatest peace I’ve ever known”—in both style and sentiment, this song is all glory. [Amazon | iTunes]

29 | Roly Porter – Aftertime
i’ve been little interested in Roly Porter’s work as one half of Vex’d, but this, his first solo album, is something else. Porter revels in his own aspirations; ejecting beats, but without betraying his bass-fuelled history, he’s drawn on a welter of hitherto untapped resources to forge Aftertime. The spectrum of music it covers is courageously broad, encompassing harsh noise, lush chords and intimate melodies (featuring the wonderful ondes Martenot). Despite its novelty in Porter’s output, there’s nothing about this album that feels experimental; there’s a confidence throughout that makes each track utterly compelling. [Amazon | iTunes]

28 | Braids – Native Speaker
i’m regularly impressed by music from Canada, and Braids are the latest. Their first album came out at the start of the year, and i’ve been returning to it constantly; their spritely brand of art rock is imaginative and uplifting, aided in no small part by Raphaelle Standell-Preston’s ever-dominant vocals. The songs are rich and substantial (most are 7-8 minutes’ duration), characterised by colourful and unexpected arrangements that serve only to propel the narrative. Standout tracks are “Plath Heart” , which both lyrically and vocally bears strong similarities to Joanna Newsom, and “Lammicken”, a brooding number fixed above a softly pounding beat; its final explosion is fantastic. [Amazon | iTunes]

27 | Deerhoof – Deerhoof vs. Evil
How on earth do Deerhoof do it? The similarities from album to album seem to grow ever more tenuous yet Deerhoof’s music is recognisable in a heartbeat. This short album is as quirky as ever; it gets off to a slow start, but many of the songs are among their best. “Super Duper Rescue Heads!” unites playful verses with an overdrive chorus (practically destroying Satomi Matsuzaki’s vocals), “Must Fight Current” is delightfully skew-whiff lazy lounge music, while “I Did Crimes For You” effects the guise of relatively straightforward indie rock, but keeps getting pulled off course. It’s all beautifully leftfield. [Norman Records | iTunes]

26 | Talvihorros – Descent Into Delta
Ben Chatwin’s music has been growing in maturity for the last few years (his 2010 album Music in Four Movements featured in my best album list last year), and Descent Into Delta is his finest creation. The guitar remains his primary sound source but it becomes highly plastic, transformed into new forms that lose sight of their origin. Supplemented here by (in Chatwin’s words) “organ, harmonium, mandolin, bells, synthesizer and waves of electronic static”, the five tracks show some influence of Aidan Baker in their structure and focus, but Chatwin’s sound is entirely his own. Descent Into Delta inhabits a somewhat amphibious and claustrophobic soundworld, but Chatwin fills it with wonders. [Bandcamp]

25 | Christopher William Anderson – Moskenstraumen
Having abandoned his previous moniker Operations, Chris Anderson has struck out in 2011 under his own name. Moskenstraumen is his first release, and the physical edition demonstrates Anderson’s deep love of design, coming in an intricately hand-made case with off-kilter concentric circles. They’re an abstract depiction of the whirlpools in the title and Anderson’s music explores them further, opening with “An End to Calm”, a track that gradually draws in and envelops the listener at its centre. The notion of maelstrom continues throughout, and while that inevitably leads to music with a noisy demeanour, it also encounters some lovely softer episodes. [Bandcamp]

24 | Stephan Mathieu – A Static Place
While the majority of ambient music has sacrificed the creative spark in favour of dry repetition or hollow paralysis, Mathieu’s music continues to demonstrate it’s a genre with prospects. Despite the title, there’s little actual stasis in Mathieu’s textures, which move and evolve with glacial speed and grace. It lacks pretention too, Mathieu deliberately accentuating the artifice of creation by making all but one of the track durations exactly 10 minutes long (the other is 20). The territory is pretty warm and familiar, but the slow, constant flux of its combination of ambient, drone and noise elements is fascinating. [Norman Records | iTunes]

23 | Frank Zappa – Feeding The Monkies At Ma Maison
For nearly two decades i’ve been in awe of the final album Frank Zappa released prior to his death, Civilization Phaze III; this release of five synclavier pieces augments that experience, containing nascent versions of some of that material. “Buffalo Voice” is effectively a stripped-down version of the one on CPIII, and what it lacks in immersiveness it gains in the clarity it affords to the inner workings of Zappa’s counterpoint; it’s a beautiful track anyway, and being heard like this does it no harm at all. As for the rest, “Secular Humanism” isn’t quite so effective as its later incarnation, but the remaining three pieces—which effectively fall between CPIII and the earlier Jazz from Hell—are splendid; despite its brevity, “Worms from Hell” is perhaps the most effective, its semi-chaotic material sounding all the more wild compacted into just 5½ minutes. [Barfko-Swill]

22 | Leyland Kirby – Intrigue & Stuff Volume 2
Intrigue & Stuff is an ongoing series begun in 2011, which to date has three volumes. Volume 2 features just four tracks, but they draw heavily on Kirby’s formidably-refined technique of grinding down to the essence of a sound. The title of “Eventually, it eats your lungs” bespeaks disease, and everything about its music is encrusted and weighed down with sonic infection, out of which a voice struggles to sing—it’s definitely one of Kirby’s strongest and most moving pieces. But even this is superceded by the final track “Complex expedition”, a 20-minute foray into entirely new hauntological waters, the omnipresent hiss and slithering bass providing the framework for a procession of analogue synth ideas. Kirby practically invented hauntology, and to hear him re-inventing it in such dazzling fashion is exhilarating. [JunoRecords | Digital download only available to subscribers]

21 | Celer – Noctilucent Clouds
Reviewed in August, this is Celer at their best, creating the most subtle of ambient soundworlds. Back then, i alluded to the music of Feldman, and that still seems the most appropriate analogy; barely audible a lot of the time, barely moving the rest of it, music rarely gets as intense or focused as this. To an extent, it suffers being broken into three arbitrary tracks, but at the same time duration becomes practically meaningless in music of this kind—one could almost listen forever. As the number of Celer releases asymptotically approaches absurdity, distinctions between many of the albums become harder to find; all the more reason then to celebrate Noctilucent Clouds which, both within Celer’s output and in ambient music generally, is unique. [Bandcamp]

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Vale of Glamorgan Festival: World Premières by Arvo Pärt and Arlene Sierra

Posted on by 5:4 in Premières | Leave a comment

On 9 September, a concert given at the Vale of Glamorgan Festival of Music by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales with the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, conducted by Tõnu Kaljuste, was for the most part concerned with the music of Arvo Pärt, featuring a new work commissioned by the festival, In Spe for wind quintet and strings. It’s a short piece, in which the winds take precedence at first: horn, oboe and bassoon take turns stating the work’s fundamental idea. The rest of the work is essentially a series of what E. E. Cummings might have called “nonvariations” on that theme; the melody is draped in constantly changing decoration, the voice moving between registers, inversions and retrogrades adding what little spice there is to be gleaned from Pärt’s agonisingly constricted use of material and harmony. Surprisingly, it all feels terribly technical; while the temptation with so much of Pärt’s music is simply to drift, switched off and blissed out, on the surface, i found myself pulled under during In Spe, staring at what lay beneath; i don’t think this is due purely to the paucity of invention on display in the work; Howard Skempton’s Lento goes round in even more demonstrably regular circles for much of its duration, but there the result is hypnotic and entirely convincing. Somehow, the material here all feels terribly workaday, almost like an exercise; unfortunately, as neither the inner workings nor their surface sheen are that interesting, this militates against In Spe, enfeebling it, even in its brief attempts at more dynamic strength. Arvo Pärt’s fans will be delighted; all the ‘tintinnabuli’ stuff is present and correct, and the piece presents them with absolutely nothing unfamiliar, nothing to think about. Read more

Tags: , , , ,