Björk

Best EPs of 2012

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The list is what brings a world of chaos into some kind of pattern. The list fixes a broken world floating out into the outer world of emptiness. The list links us to ourselves, places us together, puts us in order. The list soothes us in the way it organises memory and shapes the consciousness. Everybody loves a list for making sense of the awesome nature of all the stuff that surrounds us. The list is at the heart of everything. Everything is part of a list. Humanity is one long list linking nothing with something.
(Paul Morley, Words and Music)

Paul Morley telling it how it is, & as the year starts to fade away, it’s time once again for the series of lists detailing the best of the best that’s passed through my eardrums in the last 12 months. We begin, as ever, with the ten most outstanding EPs. Read more

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Mixtape #22 : Best Albums of 2011

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A very HAPPY NEW YEAR to you all! 5:4 is four years old today, & as in previous years, here’s a new mixtape showcasing the music from my best albums of 2011. One track from each of them—in total, 3½ hours of eclectica to start the new year in real sonic style. Do, please, support all the artists if you like what you hear (& you will!); links to buy their excellent music are included on the previous few days’ posts.

Here’s the full tracklisting (click the image for high-res artwork):

Uh Huh Her – Wake To Sleep (from Nocturnes)
This Will Destroy You – Black Dunes (from Tunnel Blanket)
Philippe Petit – 03 nyctalopia (from Nyctalopia)
Kate Havnevik – Mouth 2 Mouth (from You)
Aleks Kolkowski & Ute Wassermann – nor’easter (from Squall Line)
Kate Wax – Maze Rider (Live From The Cave) (from Dust Collision)
Arlene Sierra – Surrounded Ground – III. Egress (from Arlene Sierra Vol. 1)
John Cage – 109 [One8 and 108] [excerpt] (from 108/109/110)
Autechre & The Hafler Trio – ha3oe [excerpt] (from ae3o3)
David Lynch – Bass D Dark Stairway (from INLAND EMPIRE (Original Motion Picture Score))
Patrick Wolf – House (from Lupercalia)
Roly Porter – Al Dhanab (from Aftertime)
Braids – Plath Heart (from Native Speaker)
Deerhoof – Super Duper Rescue Heads! (from Deerhoof vs. Evil)
Talvihorros – Beta (from Descent Into Delta)
Christopher William Anderson – An End To Calm (from Moskenstraumen)
Stephan Mathieu – A Static Place Ia [excerpt] (from A Static Place)
Frank Zappa – Worms From Hell (from Feeding The Monkies At Ma Maison)
Leyland Kirby – Eventually, it eats your lungs [excerpt] (from Intrigue & Stuff Volume 2)
Celer – Part II [excerpt] (from Noctilucent Clouds)
Merzbow – Kamadhenu (Part 1) [excerpt] (from Kamadhenu)
Ulver – Providence (from Wars of the Roses)
Chubby Wolf – Deeper and the Damage From (from Los que No Son Gentos)
aTelecine – The Smuggler (Draft One) (from A Cassette Tape Culture Phase Two)
Akita / Gustafsson / O’Rourke – Two Bird [excerpt] (from One Bird Two Bird)
Tartar Lamb II – Polyimage of Known Exits: 3rd Movement [excerpt] (from Polyimage of Known Exits)
Hecq – With Angels (from Avenger)
Jenny Hval – Engines in the City (from Viscera)
Björk – Hollow (from Biophilia)
Ektoise – There and Here (from Kiyomizu)
Svarte Greiner – Twin [excerpt] (from Twin)
Access to Arasaka – Ixion (from Geosynchron)
Grutronic and Evan Parker – Mesomerism In Rhythm [excerpt] (from Together In Zero Space)
Xela – Charm [excerpt] (from Exorcism)
Black Swan – White Mourning (from The Quiet Divide)
Fovea Hex – Falling Things (Where Does A Girl Begin?) (from Here Is Where We Used To Sing)
Indignant Senility – Side B [excerpt] (from Blemished Breasts)
Monty Adkins – Memory Box (from Fragile.Flicker.Fragment)
Three Trapped Tigers – Magne (from Route One Or Die)
The Mount Fuji Doomjazz Corporation – Function (from Anthropomorphic)

Mixtape #22: (Best Albums of 2011)

MP3 [347Mb]

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Best Albums of 2011 (Part 2)

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* Please note this list has how been superseded by the one on the Best Albums of the Years page *

A list gives us the surface of something, and that leads to another list, which contains more surface, and from there, more lists, and more surface. The lists make up the surface of the universe, and the fact that the lists lead to other lists, […] list upon list leading to list upon list, it all helps supply the hidden depth in the universe. The depth where things start to get really interesting.” (Paul Morley, Words and Music)

Here’s the conclusion of my own list, with my favourite 20 albums of 2011: Read more

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Björk – The Breezeblock & Mixing It Specials

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It’s more than a little staggering to realise that today is the 45th birthday of one Björk Guðmundsdóttir, an artist i’ve followed for the entirety of her solo career and continue to admire very much (one day, i hope to explore her complete output here—when i have a couple of spare months to devote to it, that is…); to mark the occasion, two special items from the 5:4 archive.

First is my complete recording of Mary Anne Hobbs’ Breezeblock Special, devoted to Björk, broadcast on 26 October 2004. Björk’s one-hour mix—in which every song is introduced at length by Björk herself—is wonderfully diverse, and a fascinating insight into the kind of music she finds inspirational, unsurprisingly including a number of artists with whom she’s been associated: Matmos are represented by ‘Regicide’, by no means their greatest track, while 808 State‘s ‘Cübik’ may well be their finest hour (although it’s not aging well).

Kukl, the ’80s band in which Björk was vocalist, is described by Wikipedia as an ‘anarcho-punk’ group, but if ‘Dismembered’ is typical of their music, it’s much too tame for an epithet like that; regardless, it’s pretty enjoyable stuff, the seed of what would become The Sugarcubes (conspicuously absent from the programme). and there’s plenty of Björk’s solo music too; the glorious ‘Hyperballad’ (her most remixed song) opens the programme, and there are two tracks from her superlative album Medúlla, released a couple of months earlier that year, performed live at Maida Vale; they’re remarkable versions of the songs—an Inuit choir, a bell orchestra and a throat singer are all involved—and while ‘Who Is It?’ was included on one of the CD singles of that song, as far as i know ‘The Pleasure Is All Mine’ has not yet found its way onto an official release.

For the rest, despite the presence of one or two distinctly damp squibs (Kid 606‘s ‘Sugarcoated’ is a definite “must try harder” effort, and DAF‘s ‘Sato Sato’ quickly palls), the programme is an enthralling listen, and goes a long way to elaborate the more unconventional sounds and textures that have become ubiquitous in Björk’s output from Vespertine onwards. Read more

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Mixtape #13 : Vox Femina

Posted on by 5:4 in Mixtapes | 4 Comments

Today finds me feeling not at all well, so i’ve kept myself occupied making a new mixtape, with a theme i’ve wanted to explore for a while: female vocalists. At a guess, i’d say i listen to more female singers than male, and the content of this mix reflects a combination of artists with whom i’ve become familiar only recently, and others i’ve loved for many years.

The wonderfully-named Scout Niblett (who sounds as though she ought to stand four feet tall) takes a refreshingly sparse approach to her brand of rock; she also plays both drums and guitar, and her songs have a basic, elemental quality to them; that’s certainly the case in “Hot to Death”, a song that moves abruptly from soft fragility to raging fury. Peaches needs no introduction; her hypersexual songs vary wildly in their ratio of credibility to crassness, but 2003’s Fatherfucker is, i think, her best achievement, with the claustrophobic (and, for once, sex-absent) “Operate” its standout track. Better known under her initials AGF, Antye Greie-Fuchs brings a demonstrably poetic sensibility to her electronic experiments; her most recent release, Dance Floor Drachen, available free (link below), contains some of her most rhythmically engaging work to date; “TURN IMPOTENT” is enhanced further with stomach-wobbling bass pulses. “Hyperballad” remains one of Björk’s best songs, as well as one of her most remixed; this version is courageously simple, eschewing almost any kind of rhythmic movement, allowing the powerful words to attain a hypnotic vividness. No less hypnotic is Fovea Hex‘s Neither Speak Nor Remain Silent trilogy, which must rank as one of the most imaginative song-sequences ever made. “We Sleep You Bloom” palpably betrays the handiwork of Hafler Trio’s Andrew M. McKenzie underscoring Clodagh Simonds vocals; it’s simply exquisite at every moment. Occupying slightly darker but equally dreamy territory is Julee Cruise, the singer particularly beloved of David Lynch; her distinctive voice (with barely a trace of vibrato) is as integral to Lynch’s Twin Peaks saga as Badalamenti’s dark string writing. Her first album, Floating into the Night, dates from the same time as Twin Peaks, and could well be thought of as an offshoot from the series; “The Swan” is the album’s most poignant moment, the melancholic harmonies left without resolution. Deeper melancholy still from Daisy Chapman, whose new album, The Green-Eyed, is launched at the end of this week (more about this soon). “Words in Dirt” is one of her most subtly layered songs, the simple piano writing enveloped in floating additional voices, with Daisy’s own powerful vocals at the core. Read more

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Mixtape #11 : Joy

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Following a hectic Easter weekend, and a few days spent in Cambridge, here’s a new mixtape, the theme this time being joy. To start, a wonderful jazz-folk fusion number from Yellowjackets; Greenhouse is an album i’ve loved for years, and “Freda” is one of its most exciting tracks. It’s followed by the last movement from one of Michael Tippett‘s earliest mature compositions; strident and full of momentum, it briefly allows a moment or two of wistful reflection before culminating in an elated dance. Freezepop‘s latest album remains their one consistent release, and “Ninja of Love” is one of its most infectious songs. Continuing the pace like a runaway train is the opening track from Squarepusher‘s brilliant 2006 album Hello Everything, “Hello Meow”, filled with retro synths and riffs. Each album by Deerhoof has its share of instrumentals, and “Rainbow Silhouette Of The Milky Rain” bludgeons its experimental way along in rip-roaring fashion. The mix now enters a gentler mode, beginning with Imogen Heap‘s ravishing track “Just For Now”, all glorious (if realistic) optimism. And then Björk, who has surely composed some of the most unreservedly happy songs ever; “All Is Full Of Love” is here given extra treatment in the form of beats and strings, becoming if anything, more ecstatic than the original version. The “Communion” from Tournemire‘s Easter music shows him at his mystical best, placing the plainsong themes into complex, shimmering chords that hover and float in rapture. Julee Cruise, bless her, only knows extremes: her music is either abjectly mournful (“The Dying Swan”) or caught up in ecstasy, as she is here, in one of her most well-known songs. Read more

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Mixtape #8 : Versions

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After far too long a hiatus, here’s a new mixtape, this time exploring some of my favourite cover versions. To be clear, none of these tracks are what i’d call ‘remixes’, which i think of as a separate, quite different discipline; these are good ol’-fashioned covers of some great original songs.

t.A.T.u.’s version of The Smiths‘ “How Soon Is Now?” stands out on their first album, 200Km/h in the Wrong Lane, partly because it’s the only cover version, but more because of how utterly good it is. While i always was a fan of The Smiths, i’d actually far prefer to listen to t.A.T.u.’s rendition of it, their vocals somewhat less restrained than Morrissey’s. “Here’s Where The Story Ends” has been covered by many artists, and i’ve included the most recent, by Tin Tin Out featuring Shelley Nelson. Their version of the song is rather passionless, but this remix of it (the “Canny Remix”) saves the day, a dance version that shows off Nelson’s superb voice admirably. An old classic, “Blue Moon”, is given a fantastic big band treatment by Cybill Shepherd, taken from the soundtrack to the 80s TV series, Moonlighting. Shepherd’s voice is simply astounding, in what is my favourite version of this timeless song. Tori Amos makes several appearances in this mix, simply because she takes a more imaginative approach to her covers than any artist i’ve come across, always presenting the song in a new light, teasing out new connotations from the original. First up is her utterly deconstructed version of 10cc‘s epic ballad, “I’m Not In Love”, taken from her album of covers, Strange Little Girls. All sentimentality has been stripped, the music standing bare and heavy, with a palpable sense of menace; it’s beautiful and gently horrifying all at the same time. Read more

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